Vaccinations

Vaccination protects animals against serious diseases wich can be in some cases fatal, or difficult to handle. The prevention of these diseases is essential for the health of your pet. We usually start the vaccination programme when your puppy or your kitten is 8 or 9 weeks old. The programme consist in two injections separated by 2-3 weeks in dogs, and 3-4 weeks in cats; followed by an annual booster vaccination. After that, you will receive a vaccination card with all your pet’s details and when is the next booster or vaccination is due. This certificate is important if you are putting your pet into kennels, as many will not accept your pet unless you can show an up-to-date certificate. After the first course you should wait at least 5 days before letting your puppy go outside, to make sure the protection is set up.

 

CATS

When your cat should be 1st time vaccinated?

Initial vaccination programs should provide at least two vaccinations 3-4 weeks apart against some or all of the following; feline panleucopenia, calicivirus, rhinotracheitis and leukaemia (only for outdoor cats) virus at or after 8 weeks of age.

Do cats need yearly boosters?

For most cats we recommend to be a once yearly vaccine to ensure your cat is still fully protected against the main cat´s diseases.

 

What kind of diseases do we vaccinate cats for?

Feline Enteritis

This disease has a high death rate and is extremely contagious, especially under 12 months of age. Pregnant cats may lose their litter or give birth to kittens with brain damage or other important abnormalities. Symptoms are depression, loss of appetite, uncontrollable vomiting and diarrhoea, often with blood and abdominal pain. Cats that do recover may continue to infect other cats.

Feline Respiratory Disease or Catflu

Feline respiratory disease affects cats of all ages, especially young kittens. It is highly contagious and causes tongue ulcers, sneezing, coughing, runny eyes, nasal discharge and loss of appetite.
The death rate is low except for young animals, however the disease can be persitant for several weeks preventing your cat from living his normal life. Recovered cats can continue to infect other cats, and the disease may appear again if they become stressed.

Feline Leukaemia (FeLV) ( Only for outdoor cats)

The Feline Leukaemia  virus attacks the immune system. Syntoms are loss of appetite, loss of weight, apathy, jaundice, vomiting, diarrhoea, increased susceptibility to other infections, leukaemia and tumours. Infected cats may not show any symptom.
One third of the infected cat population has the virus remaining in their tears, salive, nasal secretions and urine, spreading to other cats through fights, grooming, flea bites and sneezing.

Why should vaccinate my indoor cat?

If your cat lives indoors, you might ask where she could contract these infections. Vaccination with Feline enteritis and Catflu will protect your cat, not at home, but in the situation where she must board while you are away, or she requires hospitalization for an illness or injury or when you can’t resist adding a second fur baby to your family. Vaccination of cats in multiple cat families is important, since cats in multiple cat households are more likely to experience upper respiratory infections.

Do cats feel unwell after vaccinations?

Most cats show no ill side effect from receiving a cat vaccine however following vaccination your cat may be dizzy or drowsy for a day or have some slight swelling  at the injection site. Providing your pet a comfortable area to rest, and access to fresh water and food can help him to recover faster.

 

DOGS

When your dog should be 1st time vaccinated?

Initial vaccination programs should provide at least two vaccinations 2-4 weeks apart against some or all of the following; Canine Parvovirus, Distemper, Hepatitis, Coronavirus, Leptospirosis, Kennel cough virus at or after 8 weeks of age.

Do dogs need yearly boosters?

For most dogs we recommend to be a once yearly vaccine to ensure your dog is still fully protected against the main dog´s diseases.

What kind of diseases do we vaccinate dogs for?

Canine Parvovirus

Canine parvovirus is a disease that affects dogs of all ages, being more severe in young and older dogs. The virus attacks the intestines causing bloodstained diarrhoea, uncontrollable vomiting and abdominal pain. Dogs often die from severe dehydration despite intensive veterinary care.
No direct contact with other dogs is needed for the disease to be spread. The virus is so persistent that the infected dog’s environment needs to be cleaned with a potent disinfectant to prevent spread to other dogs.

Canine Distemper

Canine distemper is a highly contagious disease that affect dogs, with young puppies being at highest risk.
Symptoms may vary including fever, sneezing , coughing, nasal discharge, vomiting, diarrhoea, loss of appetite and depression. Fits and paralysis can appear later in the disease. Treatment is usually ineffective and the recovery rate very low. Dogs that do recover may have permanent brain damage.

Canine Hepatitis

Canine hepatitis is an extremely contagious and often fatal disease. Dogs of any age can become infected. However severe cases are rare in dogs over two years of age.
Symptoms are high fever, depression, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhoea and acute abdominal pain. In severe cases death can occur within 24 to 36 hours. Dogs may develop long term liver and kidney problems if they recovered, and can act as carriers spreading the disease to other dogs for many months.

Canine Leptospirosis

Canine leptospirosis is a serious disease with high death rates. It is spread by the urine of rats and is usually transmitted to dogs by contaminated food and water, or by rat bites.

Kennel Cough

Kennel cough is a condition produced by several highly infectious diseases, which can be easily spread in parks, shows, obedience schools and kennels.
Affected dogs have a dry cough which can last for several weeks. It is distressing for dogs and their owners. This disease can lead to a pneumonia, a consequence of the infection.

Do dogs feel unwell after vaccinations?

Most dogs show no ill side effect from receiving a cat vaccine however following vaccination your cat may be dizzy or drowsy for a day or have some slight swelling  at the injection site. Providing your pet a comfortable area to rest, and access to fresh water and food can help him to recover faster.

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About Home Vets London

We provide high quality in-home Veterinary services such us medical investigations, annual health checks, diagnostics tests, online consultations, vaccinations, parasite control, micro-chipping, pet passports, export certificates, rabies vaccinations, pet hospice, prescriptions for chronic patients, chemotherapy, etc.

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